“The Social Democrats coined the phrase ‘Locked-Out Generation’ back in 2016 to highlight the issues facing the generation of younger people who cannot afford to access a mortgage and who are forced to rent long-term in a rental market that has little control and which continues to see rental costs soaring.”

The Government’s Residential Tenancies Bill, currently being debated in the Dáil, contains welcome provisions to support people and families renting, but it still falls short of the protections that are necessary to provide certainty and security for renters.

The Party’s spokesperson on Consumer Affairs, Anne Marie McNally said:

“We welcome the introduction of the Bill as at least a sign that Fine Gael are starting to recognise the plight of those in the rental sector. The Fine Gael Bill draws heavily from a Bill of the same name which we in the Social Democrats tabled last year, including providing for longer notice periods and greater penalties for rogue landlords. However, the Fine Gael version misses some crucial aspects including the publication of a transparent rent register.”

“The Social Democrats coined the phrase ‘Locked-Out Generation’ back in 2016 to highlight the issues facing the generation of younger people who cannot afford to access a mortgage and who are forced to rent long-term in a rental market that has little control and which continues to see rental costs soaring. This generation are stuck in a cycle of precarious tenancies with no security of tenure, and are paying rents that leave them absolutely no hope of saving towards a deposit, severely impacting on their ability to ever own their own home.”

“The reality is that the private rental sector is now a significant housing option – either by choice or of necessity – for people from all backgrounds, demographics and income levels. We must recognise the urgent need to professionalise the sector and protect those who are trying their best to find an affordable and secure home to rent This Bill helps but it is not enough.”

ENDS

23rd January 2018