Candidate for Meath West

Having spent several years working with an Irish charity overseas, Ronan returned home to Meath and became an English and History secondary school teacher at St Patrick’s Classical School, Navan.

His focus as a teacher has always been on helping young-adults become the best they can be, and he also co-ordinates the cross-country and athletics teams at school.

Back living in Trim with his wife and two young children, Ronan has a BA from Galway and MSc in Sustainable Development in Dublin.

“I look forward to meeting people and discussing how social democratic policies will help them and their kids into the future.”

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A couple of weekends ago the Irish Times caused a bit of a stir when it gave almost its entire Weekend section to the question of what Dublin needs. I didn’t mind the question being asked except it would have been nice had they followed it up over the next weekends with what regional cities need; what rural Ireland needs; or what the commuting belt needs.

They haven’t so I thought was there anything that they said that could be an inspiration for what Meath or Meath West might benefit from?

#1 – Put someone in charge.

This was the Irish Times first suggestion. Specifically, it concerned introducing a directly-elected mayor with significantly increased powers kind of like Sadiq Khan over in London.

This doesn’t at first sound like a runner. A mayor of Meath? However, what I do think Meath West needs are local councillors with significantly increased powers. Instead of putting someone in charge, we need to put more elected representatives in charge or at least allow them to contribute more meaningfully to the decisions that affects their constituents lives.

Currently we have a system where power at a local level is concentrated heavily in the hands of either an unelected executive who work at Council level or at central government. Now some of this isn’t all a bad thing, after all, we need career professionals, such as planners, who are trained and skilled and focussed on delivering quality services and projects, irrespective of which way the political wind blows. However, there needs to be a rebalancing whereby local councillors, whose job it is to listen to the needs of the locality, can influence in a transparent and accountable way the decisions that shape our daily lives.
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A couple of weekends ago the Irish Times caused a bit of a stir when it gave almost its entire Weekend section to the question of what Dublin needs. I didn’t mind the question being asked except it would have been nice had they followed it up over the next weekends with what regional cities need; what rural Ireland needs; or what the commuting belt needs.They haven’t so I thought was there anything that they said that could be an inspiration for what Meath or Meath West might benefit from?#1 – Put someone in charge.This was the Irish Times first suggestion. Specifically, it concerned introducing a directly-elected mayor with significantly increased powers kind of like Sadiq Khan over in London.This doesn’t at first sound like a runner. A mayor of Meath? However, what I do think Meath West needs are local councillors with significantly increased powers. Instead of putting someone in charge, we need to put more elected representatives in charge or at least allow them to contribute more meaningfully to the decisions that affects their constituents lives.Currently we have a system where power at a local level is concentrated heavily in the hands of either an unelected executive who work at Council level or at central government. Now some of this isn’t all a bad thing, after all, we need career professionals, such as planners, who are trained and skilled and focussed on delivering quality services and projects, irrespective of which way the political wind blows. However, there needs to be a rebalancing whereby local councillors, whose job it is to listen to the needs of the locality, can influence in a transparent and accountable way the decisions that shape our daily lives.

Titanic Experience. Dunbrody Famine Ship. Ulster American Folk Park. Anyone who has visited any of these sites of national interest or who has read Irish history will know how hard we have had it overseas down through the centuries.

As a result you would imagine that as a country we would be acutely aware of making sure that anyone coming to Ireland, in the same circumstances as we turned up on the docks of Liverpool, New York or New Orleans as either a refugee or as an economic migrant is at the very least dealt with dignity.

However, everything about Direct Provision, our government's response to those who've come to this shore looking for shelter is undignified.

Living, surviving, existing in open prisons, unable to work, to cook, to get about with any ease has characterised the government's response for closing on two decades.

Sometime in the future I genuinely believe we will look back at how the Government treated those who came to Ireland looking for safety and wonder how the government could have allowed it to have gone on.

In the Statement of Government Priorities 2014–2016 a commitment was given by government “to treat asylum seekers with the humanity and respect that they deserve” and to help achieve this an independent report was compiled to recommend to government improvements to Direct Provision and to other supports for asylum seekers.

Back in 2015 when this report was being compiled of the some 8,000 men, women and children in Direct Provision, 55% were there over 5 years without any decision yet being made. Because of this and due to many, many other disturbing observations, this report, the McMahon Report made a series of recommendations to the Department of Justice to deal with this and treat these people humanely.

3 years on and barely half of the recommendations have been implemented. And listening to the tales, and stories, hardships and obstacles of those who still live in Direct Provision it is hard not to be moved by what those who are still trapped in this system are being asked to endure because the government has failed to deliver a system of dealing with those left to linger here.

I entirely accept that a government needs to have a functioning way of dealing with those claiming refugee status. And I am not naive enough to believe that dealing with a claim for asylum is a quick process. However, because of our history we should at the very least hold ourselves up to whatever international best practice is out there in efficiently dealing with claims of asylum in as quick, as dignified and as humane a way as possible. We should do this because we as a country should remember what it was like to turn up on a foreign shore looking to start a new life because we were being persecuted back home or because there was simply no future for us there or for our children. And yet, we have failed.

Until then Direct Provision will be a blot on this and past governments in the same way the Magdalene Laundries and Mother and Baby Homes, were on governments before.
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Titanic Experience. Dunbrody Famine Ship. Ulster American Folk Park. Anyone who has visited any of these sites of national interest or who has read Irish history will know how hard we have had it overseas down through the centuries.As a result you would imagine that as a country we would be acutely aware of making sure that anyone coming to Ireland, in the same circumstances as we turned up on the docks of Liverpool, New York or New Orleans as either a refugee or as an economic migrant is at the very least dealt with dignity.However, everything about Direct Provision, our governments response to those whove come to this shore looking for shelter is undignified.Living, surviving, existing in open prisons, unable to work, to cook, to get about with any ease has characterised the governments response for closing on two decades.Sometime in the future I genuinely believe we will look back at how the Government treated those who came to Ireland looking for safety and wonder how the government could have allowed it to have gone on.In the Statement of Government Priorities 2014–2016 a commitment was given by government “to treat asylum seekers with the humanity and respect that they deserve” and to help achieve this an independent report was compiled to recommend to government improvements to Direct Provision and to other supports for asylum seekers.Back in 2015 when this report was being compiled of the some 8,000 men, women and children in Direct Provision, 55% were there over 5 years without any decision yet being made. Because of this and due to many, many other disturbing observations, this report, the McMahon Report made a series of recommendations to the Department of Justice to deal with this and treat these people humanely.3 years on and barely half of the recommendations have been implemented. And listening to the tales, and stories, hardships and obstacles of those who still live in Direct Provision it is hard not to be moved by what those who are still trapped in this system are being asked to endure because the government has failed to deliver a system of dealing with those left to linger here.I entirely accept that a government needs to have a functioning way of dealing with those claiming refugee status. And I am not naive enough to believe that dealing with a claim for asylum is a quick process. However, because of our history we should at the very least hold ourselves up to whatever international best practice is out there in efficiently dealing with claims of asylum in as quick, as dignified and as humane a way as possible. We should do this because we as a country should remember what it was like to turn up on a foreign shore looking to start a new life because we were being persecuted back home or because there was simply no future for us there or for our children. And yet, we have failed.Until then Direct Provision will be a blot on this and past governments in the same way the Magdalene Laundries and Mother and Baby Homes, were on governments before.

Meeting & greeting on the streets of Navan with the excellent Navan local election candidate Amy McGrath.

Some really interesting conversations with lots of local & national concerns. And nice meeting plenty of familiar faces, a number of whom have really grown up!:)

#socialdemocrats #meath #knowyourcandidates #newpolitics #newfaces #change
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Meeting & greeting on the streets of Navan with the excellent Navan local election candidate Amy McGrath.Some really interesting conversations with lots of local & national concerns. And nice meeting plenty of familiar faces, a number of whom have really grown up!:)#socialdemocrats #meath #knowyourcandidates #newpolitics #newfaces #change

 

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Good man,at least it gives someone a chance to vote for a candidate and not against one!

4 days ago

Ronan Moore for Meath West

If you are gathering your empty bottles, old newspapers well today might be the day to bring away that old couch and cushions.

What usually costs €15-20 plus depending on the size is today free over at Kells Recycling Centre as they are taking in old couches.

It'd be great to see this happen more frequently and hitting all Meath's Recycling Centres or even a truck travel round the estates to help those who might not a have a trailer but it still is a good initiative.KELLS RECYCLING CENTRE - FREE COUCH RECYCLING DAY - FOR ONE DAY ONLY Is it Time To Put Your Old Couch Out To Pasture? Bring it to Kells Recycling Centre TODAY, Saturday 17th November 2018, from 10am to 3pm. (Usual price €15 - €20) Service applies to householders only.
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If you are gathering your empty bottles, old newspapers well today might be the day to bring away that old couch and cushions.What usually costs €15-20 plus depending on the size is today free over at Kells Recycling Centre as they are taking in old couches.Itd be great to see this happen more frequently and hitting all Meaths Recycling Centres or even a truck travel round the estates to help those who might not a have a trailer but it still is a good initiative.

 

Comment on Facebook

Not much use to people who don’t have a vehicle. Their only legal option is to hire a skip or van to bring article to Kells. Not cheap from the western borders of county. Little wonder illegal operators are still flourishing.

When it comes to levels of poverty and hardship in a country and governments say one thing and charities say another, who do you believe?

Well how about believing the U.N. Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights, Philip Alston whose job it is to report on this?

Over in the UK, the U.N. Special Rapporteur has just called the government's response to the poorest people as 'punitive', 'mean-spirited and callous' and how policies and drastic cuts to social support were causing high levels of poverty and inflicting unnecessary misery in one of the richest countries in the world.

Back in 2011 on their visit to Ireland the UN Special Rapporteur said 'children continue to be the group most at risk of poverty in Ireland'. Unfortunately Philip Alston isn't coming to Ireland anytime soon, if he were, it would be interested to now hear his unbiased view of how the government has responded to 3,500+ children currently presenting as homeless in Ireland today.
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When it comes to levels of poverty and hardship in a country and governments say one thing and charities say another, who do you believe?Well how about believing the U.N. Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights, Philip Alston whose job it is to report on this?Over in the UK, the U.N. Special Rapporteur has just called the governments response to the poorest people as punitive, mean-spirited and callous and how policies and drastic cuts to social support were causing high levels of poverty and inflicting unnecessary misery in one of the richest countries in the world.Back in 2011 on their visit to Ireland the UN Special Rapporteur said children continue to be the group most at risk of poverty in Ireland. Unfortunately Philip Alston isnt coming to Ireland anytime soon, if he were, it would be interested to now hear his unbiased view of how the government has responded to 3,500+ children currently presenting as homeless in Ireland today.
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My latest newsletter for Meath West; bringing old and young together, investigating county council levies and asking people what they really want from their politicians. Can you help me deliver these to your local area? Any help much appreciated. @SocDems @walshrac

How does Taoiseach square chronic under-funding in health, housing, education, childcare, as well as climate challenges, with this weekend's promised tax cuts asks @CathMurphyTD #SocDems #AffordableLives

Fine Gael must square tax cut pledges with solving crises in health and housing - Social Democrats

www.socialdemocrats.ie

I'll be out in Navan with the Social Democrats Meath West team and our fantastic local candidate Amy McGrath on Saturday 17th from 11am- 1.30pm outside the shopping centre. Hope to see you there. If you want to get involved I'd love to hear from you! @SocDems @navandailyprss

Average rent in Dublin is now close to €2,000 a month. That means people paying close to €24,000 a year on rent - before utilities, food, cost of getting to work. Housing crisis is way worse this year than last says @CathMurphyTD #AffordableLives #Raisetheroof #HousingCrisis

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